T is for Training (My A to Z of Software Testing, Part 12)

Over the past week or so I have been doing something I’ve never done before – Housesitting for a family who have gone to Canada for their annual holiday. The Housesitting predominately involves looking after their 9-month old dog Lexi by walking her for a couple of hours a day and keeping her safe, while also looking after the house itself. The reason I am doing this is because I am in the UK for the birth of my granddaughter Heidi, who was born just a few days ago.

So, how did I get this gig and am I really qualified to do it? I’ve never been on a formal training course for dog ownership and I have actually owned my own dog for over 30 years… It’s not rocket science, but I believe you do have to fundamentally like dogs and preferably have an affinity to them; i.e. you enjoy being around them and you both respond to each other in a positive way. I love nearly all animals and generally feel at ease around them; exceptions include the obvious ones like crocs and alligators, poisonous snakes, nasty looking spiders and sharks – pretty much anything else is cool in my book. And so it goes with software testing…. there are some very dangerous animals within the software testing world – most of them loiter on social media, so it’s not too hard to avoid them!!

But let’s get back to the Training aspect of my story. In my opinion, I can be a perfectly good dog carer/walker etc. because I grew up with a dog in our house and I underwent many years of “on the job” training. I’ve also had refresher sessions over the years caring for family and friends dogs, so I believe that my lack of a piece of paper stating that I am a “certified dog carer” is no impediment to my credentials as a professional dog carer. I know there are some of you out there who probably think I’m a bit of a “fly by night” cowboy for taking this approach, but I truly believe that on the job experience and a true passion for what I do makes me more qualified than those types who have been to the right schools, read the requisite books or attended a certified training course.

Likewise, I have worked with hundreds of proficient Testers who have never been subjected to ANY formal training in the art of software testing. Now, this doesn’t mean they haven’t trained or practiced their art either. Training can take many forms and my preferred method is to discuss a new skill and then practice it in the real world and this is what I encourage my teams to do. Learn together, train together, practice together and challenge each other to be better than they were previously. I really like the Ministry of Testing #30daysoftesting challenge that ran through July, there was no prerequisites or prior learning just a set of software testing challenges that anyone could attempt. AND the great thing (for me) was that folks were encouraged to share their work.

My personal training regime is probably more severe than most people, as I have challenged myself thousands of times throughout my life to become better at pretty much everything I do – and this obviously includes software testing. I still work out almost every day to perfect my testing skills and writing this Blog is one way of doing this. Writing about some aspect of an activity forces me to think more deeply about it and analyse why I do things in a certain way. It forces me to challenge my own thinking and seek out others thinking on the same topic. This method has worked for me in all aspects of my life and there are many cross-over advantages between topics. For example, the way I train for my cycling, choosing different types of terrain (sometimes steep and difficult, sometimes fast and flat) gives me ideas on what sort of skills to develop as a Tester, including over what length of time I should dedicate to a specific skill or activity. The scheduling of specific challenges to fit in with day to day family life is another cross-over positive. Learning when to push and when to rest are among other benefits. By the way… I don’t have a professional qualification in cycling either!!

Training for anything can be arduous and tiring but the benefits endure when the chips are down and the going gets tough. My motto –
Train hard, work hard, play hard; make your worst better than everyone else’s best“.

Dateline: Bagshot, Thursday August 4 2016

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