The Why and The How

For me, everything begins with the Why and is followed by the How… 

Why did I (a successful software developer with over 15 years experience) become a Software Tester?

No, it wasn’t because I wrote crap software and therefore had to test the shit out of it before anyone also saw it!! It was, primarily, because I got bored coding the solutions and wanted to spend more time looking at the problems. I later discovered that it was far harder seeking out (potential) problems than writing/amending code – and this kept me interested… for 25 years (and counting).

How did I become a Software Tester?

I began by using the techniques that I learned while debugging my own code and from there expanded into Integration Testing (between discreet programs), System Testing, Integration Testing (between systems) and beyond. Context: you have to remember that there was no (accessible) internet in the mid 1980’s and therefore the only effective way to learn was (for the first 4-5 years) by trial and error, then I sought out training courses and books (thank you Dot Graham) and then I began attending the EuroSTAR conferences. I know it’s easy to say “you’re lucky, because in my day…”, but it was incredibly difficult to forge ideas and push boundaries when you didn’t even know the questions you needed to ask, let alone find the answers!!

Why am I dismayed that so many Testers want to code?

I have never understood the current trend for Software Testers to want to code. Even with my 15+ years as a developer (in fact, probably as a result of it) I never thought to go back and write code once I became a hands-on Tester. WHY? Because, I trusted the specialists to write any software I needed (to support my manual tests). I believe, the basis upon which we originally created a distinction between DEV and TEST (the activities and the roles) is even more important today than it was in the 1980’s, when I first became a Software Tester. Technology is the most complex it has ever been and therefore we need to keep a clear distinction between DEV and TEST.

How do I remain an effective software tester if I don’t code?

I focus on what differentiates a human from a machine. I understand context and ask questions, while a machine can only follow commands. I can remember nuances regarding what was difficult to test last time I was in the vicinity of the system under test. I can explore, while a machine has a defined route. I can change priorities at a moments notice, while a machine awaits more information. I use instinct, while a machine…. I think you get my drift – I am a human using technology to assist me with my software testing goals, not a machine awaiting guidance etc.

Why do egos get in the way of outcomes?

I believe that developing software is hard enough without letting egos get in the way. There is always more than one way to achieve an outcome and generally the simplest way is best (Einstein certainly believed so). So, why do we waste countless hours, days, weeks, months (and sometimes years) debating WHY THIS WAY IS BETTER THAN THAT? The most important aspect of any product is that it meets the need of someone (not everyone) that matters* and therefore everything else comes second and therefore doesn’t matter… If we took this approach (more often) budget/schedule overruns would be far less prevalent.

How did I get rid of ego-driven actions?

About 20 years ago (in my late 30’s / early 40’s) I began to question how I did stuff and what prevented me being as successful as I expected to be. I came to the conclusion that the root cause was the impact of my ego. Since that time I have worked tirelessly to reduce the impact of (my) ego (and the ego of others) on both my professional and personal life. Don’t think this is an easy task, because it isn’t. Learning to let go and trust others isn’t easy – especially when you’re a perfectionist, as I am. However, as with all habits, focus and practice eventually lead to change and better outcomes. Being a sportsman all my life has taught me that nothing beats practice and I still practice selflessness, empathy and compassion every day.

Why do organisations look for cheap(er) software testing solutions?

I believe that generally in life we get what we pay for. And, it’s no different when it comes to testing software. If you value your organisations reputation WHY would you hand the validation and verification of software (upon which your organisation probably relies to function on a day to day basis) over to another organisation – whose reputation is almost certainly far less important than yours? In a similar vein, why would you also allow another organisation to choose how experienced (or not) the folks are who test your software?

How do I deal with the “You’re Testing is too expensive” accusation?

My first response to this accusation is always – “Expensive? Compared to what?“. As I have said before, context is (almost) everything. If you are Volkswagen and you manipulate your test results, testing can be VERY expensive!! My context has typically been in the commercial software field – banks, utilities, logistics, telecoms etc. and therefore my approach has always been to understand the underlying business risks and quality expectations in order to determine the level of rigour required for software testing. I frame my proposals along the lines of…. “If we spend this much time and money (on testing) this is the likely outcome”. This approach has (in 99% of cases) led to a successful outcomes. The other 1%? Well, there’s always one smart-arse in the room!!

Why do I still care so much (after over 40 years in IT) about the quality of software?

I believe that if something is worth doing, it is worth doing to the best of my ability. I also believe that, due to the proliferation of software in our lives today, that the quality of software will continue to grow in importance and, as a result of this, the craft of software testing needs to continue to grow as an independent and scientifically-based occupation.

How do I maintain my passion for the craft of Software Testing?

I have a passion for causes and I decided long ago that quality was something worth fighting for. I have always admired the beauty of the journey, as much as the eventual destination (sometimes the journey is far more fulfilling). As a sports lover, I have always believed that the lead up to a goal is far more interesting than the goal itself. There are a million routes to reach a destination and I’ll, more often than not, take the route that is most satisfying – sometimes this is the quickest and most efficient route, but sometimes not!! This sometimes leads to differences in philosophy and I am quite comfortable taking my passion elsewhere. How do I justify this approach? My integrity prevents me from bending too far when it comes to quality outcomes….

Dateline: Melbourne, Friday October 14 2106

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2 thoughts on “The Why and The How

  1. Pingback: Testing Bits – 10/9/16 – 10/15/16 | Testing Curator Blog

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